CALL TODAY 1-800-441-6281

CALL TODAY 1-800-441-6281

THE SKILLINGS BLOG

The knowledge center for well drilling, water treatment & testing, FAQs, tips and know-how.

The recent news about the lead disaster in Flint Michigan and its aftermath has returned water quality to the minds of Americans. Poisoning caused by lead in water is not limited to negligence by municipal authorities. Homeowners who rely on a private well for their water supply can also be at risk. The EPA suggests well owners test their water annually for contaminants including lead. This is especially important if your home is 30 years or older.

If you receive your water from a private well, you’re responsible for the quality and safety of your home’s water supply. The EPA recommends annual testing to ensure the health of your well. One important well water test to include annually is a lead test. This is necessary for every occupant in the home, but if you have infants or small children, testing should be a priority.

If you own a home that has a private well for drinking water, it is to your benefit to learn how a well water system works. While most water well systems will last for many years, knowing what the components do can help you troubleshoot if a problem does arise.

One of the most common questions people ask the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services is how much water in a well is adequate for the average home. It is an important factor when considering building or purchasing a home and, as the NHDES says, the amount of water available in a well can be as important as the quality of the water. It is also important to consider flow rate when buying or building a new home. The Federal Housing Administration (FHA) requires 3 to 5 gallons per minute for older wells and a rate of 5 gallons per minute for new wells to pass inspection.

Drilling a water well is the first step in having a source of treated drinking water is simply a healthy choice. The second step is testing your water for contaminants.  Water testing may reveal the need for a treatment system to deal with various organic and inorganic contaminants that can be present in your drinking water. There are two types of treatment systems available. A “point of entry” system is installed inline with your water main and treats all of your water as it enters the house. A “point of use” system is generally smaller, less costly, used to treat water at a faucet, and is generally more for purifying water for drinking, cooking and sometimes washing.