CALL TODAY 1-800-441-6281

CALL TODAY 1-800-441-6281

THE SKILLINGS BLOG

The knowledge center for well drilling, water treatment & testing, FAQs, tips and know-how.

When it comes to selling a home with well water, it’s important to ask is if the well is up to the task of providing enough quality water to meet the homeowner’s needs. Real estate agents should talk to the sellers and find out how old the well is, if there have been water supply issues in the past or if they’ve experienced a well or water pump failure recently. If the answer to any of these is yes, the home could have a low flow problem.

Learning the basics of geothermal technology options for your home or business will help you determine if this heating and cooling system is right for you.

Geothermal heat pumps have been used as a source for indoor heat and cooling since the 1940s, but there are still many property owners who don’t know all the options available through this energy efficient technology.  

We often talk to homeowners who want to know how often they should test the quality of their well water. Because there is little to no regulation of well water quality depending on where you live, making sure well water is safe to drink is the responsibility of the homeowner. How often you should test depends on where you live, if there are known sources of contamination nearby or if there have been problems with the well water at your home before.

The Environmental Protection Agency is tasked with keeping us safe from contaminants in our drinking water. They have established National Primary Drinking Water Standards (NPDWRs) that set mandatory quality standards for a variety of drinking water contaminants. The regulations are legally enforceable and set Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) to protect the public from consuming water that may be a health.

What to know about fluoride and well water
If you live in a city or large town, your public water system may add fluoride to drinking water to promote dental health. Few people realize that fluoride is also naturally-occurring in water drawn from bedrock wells, especially in some regions of New Hampshire. Most naturally-occurring fluoride levels are similar to levels found in public water systems, but in some areas of the state, higher levels of fluoride can occur.